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Exact Match domains and SEO very interesting

Discussion in 'General Domain Discussion' started by James, Oct 22, 2010.

  1. snoopy

    snoopy Membership: VIP

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    Google analytics cannot measure the time spent on site of a bouncing visitor. There is no end point to measure. So if there is only one page view the time spent on site is reported as 0:00.

    I think some stats packages are able to measure page scrolling and other factors but still this is a measure that can't really be properly measured on a bouncing visitor.

    So for a site with a 90% bounce rate the "time spent on site" relates to the 10% who don't bounce. Ie in your examples, the 90% bounce rate with 5 seconds spent on site means 90% bounce after spending an unknown amount of time on the site and the other 10% spend 50 seconds plus on the site.

    For the 90% / 50 second example, again nothing is known on the 90% who bounce in terms of time on site and the other 10% spent 500 seconds+.
     
  2. DavidL

    DavidL Membership: VIP

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    auDA Member:
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    Sorry I don't get you? Why can't analytics (or Google) measure when a visitor leaves a site after bouncing?

    This is from analytics:

    Visits......Av Time on Page....Bounce Rate
    3,349......00:02:37..............81.18%

    I don't understand why you're saying that 2:37 would apply only to the people who browse other pages of the site (the 18.82%). Also, if that were the case why is the average time spent on the site so long (twice the site average)
     
  3. James

    James Membership: VIP

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    Depends what type of site you have but, if you have a site which is purely CPA or all your information is on page 1 then your bounce rate will be crazy high. But specific clients I have they want visitors to be sticky on the website and drive down the bounce rate from like 70% to 30% which I have achieved.
     
  4. snoopy

    snoopy Membership: VIP

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    Because there is no end point to measure. Google doesn't know when you've left a site. The "Time on site" is the time between the first page view and the last page view from what I know of it.
     
  5. soj

    soj Founder

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    David, Snoopy is 100% correct. If you look through Analytics, and click on your keywords which visitors have come to your site, you go down to the long-tail keywords and you'll notice that those that have a 100% bounce rate, have 00:00:00 for their time on the site.

    Google Analytics requires the first page load, then a subsequent page load to determine how long they were on the first page for.
     
  6. DavidL

    DavidL Membership: VIP

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    auDA Member:
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    Ahhh - now I get you. Thanks.

    A related metric which I guess Google would consider is if a user clicks on a search result and eventually hit back to return to the search results, how long they stay on that site. What do you think?
     
  7. snoopy

    snoopy Membership: VIP

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    Can see the logic but I doubt they are using this type of data.